Parallel Clauses

I am a former English major and this construction, which I see more and more often, bothers me.   Example: “Campbell’s soup is delicious, nutritious, and it may help you lose weight.”
The first two items in the clause use the verb ‘”is,” and are parallel.   But the third item switches to a new verb, while posing as the third item in the series. It seems to me the correct construction would be:  “…is delicious and nutritious, and it may help you lose weight.”
Not sure what rule this breaks, or if there is a name for this infraction, if indeed it is incorrect. Thanks for any insight.
Tom A., Houma, LA

Answer: You identified the problem correctly: a lack of parallelism. If you start with two adjectives (delicious, nutritious), you are obligated either to separate the ideas as you have correctly done (delicious and nutritious, and it may help you lose weight) OR find a way to continue parallelism as best you can and retain meaning (even if the result may seem awkward). For example: “Campbell’s soup is delicious, nutritious, and low in calories.” “Campbell’s soup is delicious, nutritious, and helpful for weight control.” Or a writer could choose to shift emphasis: “Delicious and nutritious, Campbell’s soup may also help you lose weight.”

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